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That was nice, but so what? Participatory Arts for Sustainable Development

Publication Date: July 24, List Price: Since the s, critics and curators have broadly accepted the notion that participatory art is the ultimate political art: that by encouraging an audience to take part an artist can promote new emancipatory social relations. Around the world, the champions of this form of expression are numerous, ranging from art historians such as Grant Kester, curators such as Nicolas Bourriaud and Nato Thompson, to performance theorists such as Shannon Jackson.

Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship by Claire Bishop

It concludes with a discussion of long-term educational projects by contemporary artists such as Thomas Hirschhorn, Tania Bruguera, Pawe? Althamer and Paul Chan. Here's an example of what they look like:.


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    There is no other way of making sensuous man rational except by first making him aesthetic. Written in , just after the French Revolution had turned to Terror, Schiller tried to resolve the discrepancy between nature and cultural refinement, positing that the human need to play can bridge various and sometimes destructive impulses, so that we may become fully human—and social. Schiller aimed to conserve an autonomous sphere of art, one that is at the same time pedagogically indispensable to a just state.


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    • He argued that it is through the aesthetic that humans can become free and moral. Why is this timely? Marxists tend to see contemporary politics organized less around the production of commodities than their consumption—a politics of play with no end in sight. A shift within play promises to deal with the problem on its own ground. With a focus on spectatorship befitting this Kantian pedigree, the book redefines participatory art while historicizing it.

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      Past Participating

      In short: the art Bishop examines is allowed to look good, to excite our senses, even to be beautiful. Bishop sees in theatrical models and the performance art that sought to displace them the best historical genealogy for these concerns. Bishop aims to show this by a fresh contextualization of art of the s and s, concentrating on the Situationists and their sexually obsessed satellite Jean-Jacques Lebel, and on art from Argentina, Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union, and Britain——a range of political regimes exhibiting varying levels of repression and offering wide scope for critique.

      This central section of the book is prepared by case studies of historical avant-gardes, in particular the Futurists and Russian revolutionary artists.

      Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship

      Always in the background, and explicitly addressed in the first and the last two chapters on delegate performance and pedagogical performance, respectively is the contemporary art scene since roughly The first impression of Artificial Hells is therefore breadth, not detail. Bishop swings through fascinating comparative studies easily, and is impressive in teasing out differences, mostly in how audiences are approached: dysfunctional but ever complicated cocktails of invitation, intimidation, and neglect. This leads both to gains in clarity and dangers of reductionism.